FAQ

Frequently asked questions from Private Patients

Does Latus Therapy acccept insurance?

Latus Therapy does not participate on any insurance panels and are considered an “out of network provider”.

What is the price for a therapy session?

Cost of Services:
Our fees vary according to the type of service provided.

Initial Assessment: During the first session, your therapist will gather information regarding your background and symptoms. This is a formal evaluation. You and your therapist will develop a therapy plan and set goals. This session will be a 45-60 minute session. The cost of the initial assessment is $165.

Single Treatment Sessions: The cost of each 30-minute therapy session is $75.00. A single 60- minute therapy session is $140.00.

Multi-pack Treatment Sessions: For your convenience, we offer bundled multi-pack sessions. The bundled packages may be used as 30 or 60 minute treatment sessions. Multi-pack A – $420 for 180 minutes (3 hours). Multi-pack B – $685 for 300 minutes (5 hours). Multi-pack C – $1350 for 600 minutes (10 hours).

Any service beyond the standard 30 minute session, such as phone consultation exceeding 10 minutes or excessive paperwork, will incur additional fees to be discussed prior to service provided.

When will I be billed?

Clients are responsible for the full payment at the time service is provided. We only accept payment from debit /major credit cards or PayPal (for advance payment). Payment for sessions are expected before the session begins. If a session package is purchased, this will be paid in full before the start of the first session. We are not able to see clients who have not paid for their session upfront.

What kind of equipment will I need in order to have a teletherapy session?

Latus Therapy provides telepractice therapy services for the convenience and ease of clients. Clients must have the necessary technology needed, in order for sessions to be most productive.

Minimum requirements:

  • Web enabled computer, tablet or smartphone
  • High speed internet connection, at least 5 megabytes per second
  • Quiet distraction free environment
  • Web-cam – can be internal or external to computer
  • Microphone – can be internal or external to computer
  • Noise canceling headphones with microphone (optional)
Will I be billed if I miss my online appointment?

Your appointment time is reserved for you. Cancellations of therapy sessions must be made 24 hours prior to scheduled session time so that we can fill the time with another client. There is no charge for any session cancelled 24 hours or more in advance of the scheduled session. Sessions cancelled with less than 24 hours notice will be charged the full rate of the session scheduled.

How long is each therapy session?

Typical treatment sessions are either 30 or 60 minutes. The duration of your session will be determined by the clinician after the evaluation.

Do I need therapy items or testing materials?
  • The client agrees to print out materials that are emailed prior to the next scheduled session (sent at least 24 hours in advance)
  • If items are needed to be mailed, the client agrees to pay postage
  • If receiving occupational therapy services, fine motor items will likely be necessary. These will be household items but also may involve small purchases. The client agrees to provide these items.
Is Teletherapy for Everyone?

While study after study demonstrates the effectiveness of this excellent alternative, nevertheless some patients will still benefit more from traditional on-site therapy. For example, online therapy is not the preferred option for patients with minimal attention skills or alertness.

Teletherapy is recognized by both the speech and occupational licensing of the licensing boards

Background
ASHA defines telepractice as “the application of telecommunications technology to delivery of professional services at a distance by linking clinician to client, or clinician to clinician, for assessment, intervention, and/or consultation.” Telepractice typically occurs in real time and ‘face to face’ with a clinician via online videoconferencing.

Telepractice was approved by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) as an appropriate method of service delivery in 2005. ASHA’s position is that “telepractice is an appropriate model of service delivery for the professions of speech-language pathology [and audiology]. Telepractice may be used to overcome barriers of access to services caused by distance, unavailability of specialists and, or subspecialists, and impaired mobility” (ASHA, Speech-Language Pathologists Providing Clinical Services via Telepractice: Position Statement [Position Statement], 2005).

ASHA has also added telepractice to its directory of special interest groups (SG-18) (2011) http://www.asha.org/SIG/18/About-SIG-18/

Is Teletherapy for Everyone?

While study after study demonstrates the effectiveness of this excellent alternative, nevertheless some patients will still benefit more from traditional on-site therapy. For example, online therapy is not the preferred option for patients with minimal attention skills or alertness.

Teletherapy is recognized by both the speech and occupational licensing of the licensing boards

Background on Teletherapy

ASHA defines telepractice as “the application of telecommunications technology to delivery of professional services at a distance by linking clinician to client, or clinician to clinician, for assessment, intervention, and/or consultation.” Telepractice typically occurs in real time and ‘face to face’ with a clinician via online videoconferencing.

Telepractice was approved by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) as an appropriate method of service delivery in 2005. ASHA’s position is that “telepractice is an appropriate model of service delivery for the professions of speech-language pathology [and audiology]. Telepractice may be used to overcome barriers of access to services caused by distance, unavailability of specialists and, or subspecialists, and impaired mobility” (ASHA, Speech-Language Pathologists Providing Clinical Services via Telepractice: Position Statement [Position Statement], 2005).

ASHA has also added telepractice to its directory of special interest groups (SG-18) (2011) http://www.asha.org/SIG/18/About-SIG-18/

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